Luo Scientific Reserve

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Central Africa > Democratic Republic Congo > Luo Scientific Reserve


Contents

Summary

Species Trend Data Quality
P.pan.
P.pan.
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown

Site

The Luo Scientific Reserve in the Maringa-Lopori-Wamba Forest Landscape in the Congo Basin is one of the best-known bonobo sites. It lies in the northern sector of the species range. The Luo SR is a nationally protected area of 628km2 with important intact forest blocks of global importance.[1]

Within Luo SR is located Wamba research site.

Ape status

Year of Survey Total km of recces Total km of transects Ape nest group encounter rate Indice of kilometer abundance Lead Organisation Source
Sept-Dec 2007 32 / 0.31/km / AWF, WCBR,CREF SOF 2008

Table 1 : Survey results for Luo SR (proposed extension)[2]


Year Estimated Number of Individuals Source Dates
2009
2008
2007
2006

Table 3: Bonobo population estimates in Luo Scientific Reserve

Threats

Visit Wamba research site for further information.


Major Threats Luo SR
Poaching
Disease
Agriculture
Logging
Mining

Table 4: Threats to bonobos in Luo Scientific Reserve


Conservation activities

Visit Wamba research site for further information.

Conservation actions Luo SR
Law Enforcement
Long-term Research
Permanent Monitoring Program
Education
Public Awareness Campaign
Ecotourism

Table 3: Conservation activities in Luo Scientific Reserve

Surveys

Visit Wamba research site for further information.

External Links

Notes

  1. Maringa-Lopori-Wamba PDF summary
  2. State of the Forest 2008


References

  • Dupain, J., Nackoney, J., Kibambe, J.-P., Bokelo, D., Williams, D. (2009): Maringa-Lopori-Wamba Landscape, in: The Forests of the Congo Basin - State of the Forest 2008, Eds : de Wasseige, C., Devers, D., de Marcken, P., Eba’a Atyi, R., Nasi, R. and Mayaux, Ph., 2009, Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union, p. 329-338.
  • Thompson, J., Hohmann, G., Furuichi, T. (editors) (2003). Bonobo workshop: Behaviour, ecology and conservation of wild bonobos. Inuyama, Japan.
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