Lomako Yokokala Faunal Reserve

From Apeswiki

Jump to: navigation, search

Central Africa > Democratic Republic Congo > Lomako Yokokala Faunal Reserve

Contents

Summary

Species Trend Data Quality
P.pan.
P.pan.
Unknown
Unknown
High
High

Site

The Lomako Yokokala Faunal Reserve (RFLY) is part of the Maringa-Lopori-Wamba Forest Landscape. The 3.625 km² reserve was gazetted in 2006. The reserve in the Equateur province directly neighbours Lomako CBNRM, also known as Lomako Forest.[1] About 80 % of the surface is forest covered and 20 % swamp. Almost 50 % of the area consists of rural complexes and young secondary forest.[2]

Not only important bonobo populations live in RFLY, but also forest elephants and other key species.[3]

Ape status

The results of regular monitoring surveys in RFLY indicate a positive trend for the wildlife in this macro-zone: the number of observations of bonobo signs (nests) and also of elephant signs (traces) has increased since 2006 whereas the number of active hunting camps decreased significantly: of 45 hunting camps in 2004 only 15 remained active in 2007.[2]

Year of Survey Total km of recces Total km of transects Ape nest group encounter rate Indice of kilometer abundance Lead Organisation Source
Sept-Dec 2007 450 / 0.7/km 0.68 AWF SOF 2008
Sept-Dec 2006 380 / 0.34 indiv. nests/km 0.34 AWF SOF 2008
Apr-Jun 2006 450 / 0.27 indiv. nests/km 0.27 AWF SOF 2008
Aug-Oct 2004 / 105 0.8/km AWF SOF 2008

Table 1 : Survey results for RFLY[2]


Although surveys are conducted regularly more detailed information about the bonobo population in RFLY are needed:

  • the exact number of individuals,
  • their distribution throughout the reserve,
  • the importance of the reserve for their habitat.


Year Estimated Number of Individuals Source Dates
2009
2008
2007
2006

Table 2: Bonobo population estimates in RFLY

Threats

Major Threats RFLY
Poaching yes
Disease no
Agriculture
Logging
Mining

Table 3: Threats to bonobos in RFLY

Despite its status as a protected area RFLY lost 0.1% of its forest from 2000-2005.[2]

Conservation activities

Conservation actions RFLY
Law Enforcement
Long-term Research yes
Permanent Monitoring Program yes
Education
Public Awareness Campaign
Ecotourism in preparation

Table 4: Conservation activities in RFLY

As the RFLY is part of the Maringa-Lopori-Wamba Landscape project it is an important element in the complex land use plan for the whole region.

Regular surveys are part of the monitoring program developed for the RFLY macro-zone.

AWF has initiated a bonobo habituation programme to enable great ape tourism in the reserve. Profits made from tourism will benefit local communities and the management of the reserve.[2]

Surveys

Monitoring surveys are conducted twice per year. Their main focus is the monitoring of forest elephant and bonobo signs and human activities in the reserve. Whilst the first surveys were conducted by employees of the African Wildlife Foundation AWF they are now conducted by agents of the ICCN and authorized locals trained by AWF. For each survey nine reconnaissance transects are walked, totalling 450 km.[2]


Notes

  1. Thompson-Handler, N., Malenky, R.K., and Reinartz, G.E. (Eds.) ACTION PLAN FOR Pan paniscus: REPORT ON FREE-RANGING POPULATIONS AND PROPOSALS FOR THEIR PRESERVATION, Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Zoological Society of Milwaukee County, 1995.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Dupain, J., Nackoney, J., Kibambe, J.-P., Bokelo, D., Williams, D. (2009): Maringa-Lopori-Wamba Landscape, in: The Forests of the Congo Basin - State of the Forest 2008, Eds : de Wasseige, C., Devers, D., de Marcken, P., Eba’a Atyi, R., Nasi, R. and Mayaux, Ph., 2009, Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union, p. 329-338.
  3. Dupain,J., Botamba, F., Bwebwe, F., Nackoney, J., Way, T., Williams, D. (2009): MOV.1.1.A: UPDATED PARTICIPATIVE LANDSCAPE LAND USE PLANNING STRATEGY DOCUMENT.

External Links

References

  • Dupain,J., Botamba, F., Bwebwe, F., Nackoney, J., Way, T., Williams, D. (2009): MOV.1.1.A: UPDATED PARTICIPATIVE LANDSCAPE LAND USE PLANNING STRATEGY DOCUMENT.
  • Dupain, J., Nackoney, J., Kibambe, J.-P., Bokelo, D., Williams, D. (2009): Maringa-Lopori-Wamba Landscape, in: The Forests of the Congo Basin - State of the Forest 2008, Eds : de Wasseige, C., Devers, D., de Marcken, P., Eba’a Atyi, R., Nasi, R. and Mayaux, Ph., 2009, Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union, p. 329-338.
  • Thompson, J., Hohmann, G., Furuichi, T. (editors) (2003). Bonobo workshop: Behaviour, ecology and conservation of wild bonobos. Inuyama, Japan.
Personal tools