Kokolopori Bonobo Reserve

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Central Africa > Democratic Republic Congo > Kokolopori Bonobo Reserve

Contents

Summary

Species Trend Data Quality
P.pan.
P.pan.
Unknown
Unknown
Good
Good


Site

The Kokolopori Bonobo Reserve in the Tshuapa district in the Equateur province was created as a research zone, but was officially recognized as a reserve by DRC government in May 2009. At the moment, it has the status of a community-based natural resource managment area (CBNRM). The reserve, 4,785km2 in size, is located within the Maringa-Lopori-Wamba Forest Landscape in central DRC. In the north it neighbours the BCI site Lonua.

Almost 90% of the area is forest covered, about 10% consists of swamp forest. Rural complexes and young secondary forest only represent 0,5-0,7% of the surface.[1][2]

Ape status

Kokolopori harbours more than 1000 wild bonobos. Since some groups are fully habituated to human presence the bonobos can be studied at close range. Five groups are tracked daily by survey teams of Vie Sauvage, a local NGO in cooperation with Bonobo Conservation Initiative.

Year of Publication Estimated Number of Individuals Source Dates Organisation
2010 1000 BCI BCI
2009
2008

Table 1: Bonobo population estimates in Kokolopori

Threats

please add information


Major Threats Kokolopori
Poaching yes (subsistence hunting
+ poaching by military)
Disease
Agriculture yes
Logging
Absence of eating taboo yes

Table 2: Threats to bonobos in Kokolopori

Conservation activities

Conservation actions Kokolopori
Law Enforcement yes
Long-term Research yes
Permanent Monitoring Program yes
Education yes
Public Awareness Campaign yes
Ecotourism

Table 3: Conservation activities in Kokolopori

In 2002, Bonobo Conservation Initiative BCI started its work in Kokolopori in cooperation with Vie Sauvage, a local NGO. Vie Sauvage started efforts for conservation and sustainable management which resulted in the creation of the Kokolopori Bonobo Reserve in 2009. For this purpose, nine logging concessions were converted into forest concessions, covering an area of 1.1 million hectares.[3]

The Vie Sauvage/BCI cooperation not only targets the monitoring of bonobos and other biodiversity but an integrated management of the reserve associated with community development activities (extracted from the BCI website) :

  • Training and participation of rangers in biodiversity surveys and on-going monitoring
  • Training of local staff and members of other Congolese NGOs in Information Exchange methodology
  • Discovery and initiation of the first field study on the rare Salongo monkey (Cercopithecus dryas)
  • Sustainable agriculture program provides disease-resistant cassava (the local staple crop) and improved seed stocks to improve nutrition and reduce impact on the forest
  • Independent community-driven distribution of improved cassava cuttings to other communities
  • Community conservation and training centers established in three focal villages, Yalokole, Yettee and Yotemankele
  • Micro-enterprise projects with the Kokolopori Women’s Association, including palm oil extraction, soap making and couture
  • Support for local schools through purchase and donation of school supplies, textbooks and other materials
  • Establishment of Kokolopori’s first health clinic and hiring of a doctor and nurses
  • On-going conservation sensitization programs
  • Establishment of the first institution of higher learning in the region, the Djolu Technical College for Conservation and Rural Development
  • Research initiated by local Congolese partners has attracted international attention. We hosted a Harvard University researcher, and welcome other researchers to study at Kokolopori



Surveys

please add information

Notes

  1. Dupain,J., Botamba, F., Bwebwe, F., Nackoney, J., Way, T., Williams, D. (2009): MOV.1.1.B: UPDATED PARTICIPATIVE LANDSCAPE LAND USE PLAN DESIGN.
  2. State of the Forest 2008, p. 331.
  3. Dupain,J., Botamba, F., Bwebwe, F., Nackoney, J., Way, T., Williams, D. (2009): MOV.1.1.A: UPDATED PARTICIPATIVE LANDSCAPE LAND USE PLANNING STRATEGY DOCUMENT.

External Links

References

  • Thompson, J., Hohmann, G., Furuichi, T. (editors) (2003). Bonobo workshop: Behaviour, ecology and conservation of wild bonobos. Inuyama, Japan.
  • Dupain, J., Nackoney, J., Kibambe, J.-P., Bokelo, D., Williams, D. (2009): Maringa-Lopori-Wamba Landscape, in: The Forests of the Congo Basin - State of the Forest 2008, Eds : de Wasseige, C., Devers, D., de Marcken, P., Eba’a Atyi, R., Nasi, R. and Mayaux, Ph., 2009, Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union, p. 329-338.
  • Dupain,J., Botamba, F., Bwebwe, F., Nackoney, J., Way, T., Williams, D. (2009): MOV.1.1.A: UPDATED PARTICIPATIVE LANDSCAPE LAND USE PLANNING STRATEGY DOCUMENT.
  • Dupain,J., Botamba, F., Bwebwe, F., Nackoney, J., Way, T., Williams, D. (2009): MOV.1.1.B: UPDATED PARTICIPATIVE LANDSCAPE LAND USE PLAN DESIGN.
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